イギリスの政治経済 

UKの政治経済

イギリスはEUにとどまるべきではない。貿易赤字も巨額(2016-6-1)



 

イギリスはEUにとどまるべきではない。貿易赤字も巨額(2016-6-1)

Telegraf 2016-6-1

We may not always like it, but one of the intractable realities of the human condition is that nothing ever stays the same. Families, companies, nations, the English language, our daily lives: they all change, for better or for worse, quickly or slowly, all of the time.

Politics is no different. It is therefore absurd to frame the European referendum as a choice between a terrifying revolution (Leave) and an unthreatening embrace of the status quo (Remain); instead, what we are being asked is to choose between two radical change agendas with complex, unpredictable consequences.

Brexiters have been confronted with the possible downsides of leaving; now Remainians must address the financial and political risks of staying

Both come with risks and challenges; both are uncertain and will require adjustments; both will mould our country, our economy and our political institutions into something very different to what they are today. But while the Leave side has relentlessly (and rightly) been grilled about its post-Brexit vision, the Remain camp has been shamefully let off the hook.

It hasn’t had to explain how exactly it sees the EU evolving over the next decade or two, and what we would therefore be signing up to. Brexiteers have been confronted with the possible downsides of leaving; now Remainians must address the financial and political risks of staying.

The starting point for any sensible discussion is to acknowledge that the EU is facing an ongoing economic and social crisis, and is desperate to deepen its integration further. Remain must tell us how this would impact the UK, and why it thinks that we would be better off dealing with the fallout inside, rather than outside, the EU.

What, for example, will happen when the next Eurozone crisis erupts (and no, denying that there will be one isn’t good enough)? A new deal appears to have been cobbled together for Greece, but the real worry must be Italy, a country whose economy has not grown at all since 2000, which is crippled by 11.4 per cent unemployment and a massive national debt, and which could bring down the euro.

When I was growing up in France, it was always clear that the EU was a political project that used economics as a tool of state-building

Would we have to put our hands in our pockets directly when the next crisis erupts, or would the impact merely be indirect, reducing our exports to the region? It may be that the European Central Bank is forced to resort to helicopter money, but there is a very real danger that Germany would refuse to put up with that, destabilising the Continent.

There are thus political risks wherever we look. Will Spain go populist? Will the current riots spiral out of control in France? Austria’s economy has been growing yet an extremist, authoritarian candidate grabbed 49.9 per cent of the vote at the presidential elections. What next? What is the chance of Marine Le Pen winning a presidential election in France, if not next year then in six years’ time, and waging all-out war on globalisation? What would the impact be on our economy and investments in France? Wouldn’t we be safer out?

Eastern Europe has also started to elect unsavoury politicians: it may well be that the immigration crisis will tear the EU apart, especially when the Dublin convention on refugees is replaced by a quota system. Expanding the EU to include additional countries, which is very much Brussels’s plan, would exacerbate opposition to the free movement of people.

Given all of this, Remain needs to explain why we wouldn’t be better off trying to diversify our economy towards more resilient parts of the world. The share of our exports that goes to the EU has already collapsed from 55 per cent in 1999 to 44 per cent last year – but shouldn’t we be trying to reduce this further and faster?

If the eurozone succeeds in harmonising its fiscal policies and becoming more like a single entity, it may succeed in overriding British interests more effectively, which could be another reason for us to leave.

The EU was always intended by its founders to be a process – a mechanism by which formerly independent European countries gradually bind themselves together into an ever-closer union. Crises were seen as useful flashpoints that would trigger a further push to integration, and its central institutions were deliberately designed to seek and accrue power.

When I was growing up in France, it was made consistently clear that the EU was a political project that used economics as a tool of state-building; the single market was created because all countries have a free internal market, not because the EU’s founding fathers believed in international free trade. We used to be taught all of this openly and explicitly at school: the EU was the obvious, rational future, the only way war could be avoided and the best way to protect our social models from the ravages of “Anglo-Saxon” markets.

There are therefore two possibilities if we vote to stay: eventual abrupt disintegration, or further EU integration. If the latter, how many more powers will we give up when the next treaty comes along, and how much “progress” will be made in critical areas like a European army, tax harmonisation, and the centralisation of justice and home affairs? Why haven’t voters been told ahead of June 23?

The biggest, costliest and most immediate change after a Remain vote would be psychological. Forget about all the caveats: an In victory would be hailed as proof that Britain has finally ceased fighting its supposed European destiny. Our bluff would have been called in the most spectacular of fashions: after decades of dragging our feet, of being ungrateful Europeans, of extracting concessions, rebates and opt-outs, of trying to stand up for our interests, we would finally have hoisted the white flag. The idea that we would hold another referendum on the next treaty would simply be laughed out of town. Voting to Remain would thus be a geopolitical disaster for the UK, a historic failure.

Comfortable, middle-class voters who are considering sticking with the devil they believe they know need to think again. Voting to remain is a far greater leap into the unknown than voting to leave. It’s self-evidently normal to be independent and prosperous: just look at America, Australia, Canada or Singapore. But there are no known examples of a previously independent democracy being subsumed into a dysfunctional, economically troubled technocracy and doing well as a result. As mad gambles go, it is hard to think of anything worse.

 

 

英国のEU離脱は、極めて合理的な判断だった(2016-6-25)
英トップエコノミストが予言していた「崩壊」

東洋経済オンライン東洋経済オンライン

 

© 東洋経済オンライン 英国No.1エコノミストが「EU離脱」という判断の正しさを解説する( 写真:ロイター/アフロ)

 英国保守党・労働党双方のブレーンでもあったロジャー・ブートル氏は、2015年に上梓された『欧州解体』で、英国のEU離脱を予言していた。

 同書から、英国がEUを離脱するメリットや、EUとの関係について論考した内容を抜粋してお届けする。

 英国がEUから抜けた途端に、すべてのEU向け輸出が消滅すると考えるのは誤りだ。何が起ころうと、そのかなりの部分は継続するだろう。実際に何が起こるのかは、どのような種類の貿易関係が合意されるかによる。確かな答えは知りようがないが、人間の欲と既存の国際協定を考えれば、ある程度の当たりをつけることは可能だ。とにかくひとつはっきりしているのは、緊密な貿易関係を続けることが両者にとって大きな利益になるということ。したがってそういう帰結になる可能性が最も高い。

 英国は強い立場で交渉に臨める。あまり知られていないことだが、ほかのEU加盟国にとって、英国は米国を上回る最大の輸出先なのだ。それはすなわち、多くの欧州大陸の企業にとって英国が最大の市場であることを意味している。たとえばイタリアのフェラーリ社は最近、英国が同社の最大の市場になったと発表した。

 そのうえEU各国の対英貿易収支は明らかに黒字になっている。つまり英国からの輸入よりも、英国への輸出のほうが多いということだ(これは英国がEUとの貿易で損失を出しているということではない。貿易関係から得られる利益にはさまざまなものがあるが、自国で作ると高くつくものを国外から安く輸入できるという点もそのひとつなのだ。さらに言うなら、すべての貿易相手国と収支を均衡させる必要はなく、そうするメリットもない)

 したがって、英国がEUから離脱すれば、ドイツの自動車メーカーのBMWやメルセデスをはじめ、無数の欧州大陸の企業が、英国との自由でオープンな貿易関係を維持しようと必死になるだろう。そのために彼らは自国政府やEUに働きかけるはずだ。実際、英国のEUとの貿易関係は非常に緊密で広範なので、交渉の過程で英国が特別に有利な条件を引きだすこともできるかもしれない。

 考えうる協定の枠組みは、わずかな差異しかないものも含め、数えきれないほどある。

 EU支持派が英国のEU離脱の可能性について語るとき、彼らはしばしば、英国が単一市場に「背を向ける」とか、はなはだしきは「閉めだされる」といった言い方をする。これは相当終末的に聞こえる─―そしてそれを意図した―─言葉だ。EU向けの輸出が大きなシェア(おそらく4045)を占める中で、ある種の経済的惨事を予感させるものがある。

 頭に浮かぶのは、一定の閉鎖空間に単一市場が設置されていて、その中でだけビジネスが行われているという構図だ。有価証券が集中的に取引される証券取引所のような空間を考えてもいいかもしれないし、古い市場町にあった穀物取引所のような建物を思い浮かべてもいいかもしれない。そこへの入り口はドアで守られている。EUから去ることはそのドアを背後で閉める――あるいは乱暴に叩きつける――ようなもので、そんなことをすれば市場へのアクセスは失われてしまう……

 そこまで極端なことにはならないと見る向きもあるが、彼らもまた、英国が離脱すれば単一市場への「完全な」アクセスが失われるという言い方をする。メンバーでない者はその空間の全域ではなく、一部区域に限って入場を許されるというイメージだろうか。あるいは全域には入れるが、月曜日と火曜日だけとか、毎日11時から15時までといった具合に、時間を制限されるイメージかもしれない。

 こうしたイメージはまったくの誤解である。世界中のすべての国がこの空間に入れるのだ。ただしメンバーでない国は入り口である種の入場料(共通域外関税)を払わなければならず、またその空間内で商品を売りに出すには「取引所」のルールに定められたすべての条件と規格を守らなければならない。

 だが、それだけだ。鍵のかかったドアはないし、アクセスの時間制限もない。単一市場のルールや規格に従うという点に関して言えば、それは輸出者が世界のどの市場でもしなければならないことだ。英国が米国に輸出するなら、米国のルールに従わなければならないし、米国の規格に合わせなければならない。中国やオーストラリアに輸出する場合でも同じこと。違うのは、英国がすべての経済分野について米国や中国、オーストラリアのルールと規格に従う必要はないということである。

 単一市場のメンバーにならずとも、単一市場に輸出を行うことは完全に可能だ。結局のところ、米国、中国、日本、インドなど単一市場に加わっていないたくさんの国々が、EUに首尾よく輸出を行っている。彼らはこぞってEUFTAを結ぼうとしているが、単一市場に加わることは考えていない。だとしたら、英国が単一市場の一員であることがなぜそれほど重要なのだろうか。

 ここまでに明らかにしてきたとおり、英国はEUから離脱しても、おそらくEUとの間に条件のよい緊密な貿易関係を確立できるだろう。しかし私はそうならないリスクについても認めてきた。このリスクが多くの人々に、英国が世界の中で「独りぼっち」になるのではないかという恐れを抱かせている。上記の議論では、そうした恐れを鎮めるような諸点を示した。

 さらに、英国は世界の多くの国々とFTAを結べるだろう。それだけではない。英国がそれを望むならだが、「クラブに加わる」ことの利点を提供してくれそうな組織が2つ存在する。

 ひとつ目は北大西洋自由貿易地域(NAFTA)だ。美術史家のケネス・クラークはあえてその考えを批判し、こう述べた。

 英国人の魂には常に何かロマンチックなものがあった。英国はどんな困難にも屈しないという「軽騎兵旅団の突撃」のような話に、私たちは感動せずにはいられないのだ。EUを抜けてNAFTAに入るという発想の背後にも、同じような心情がある。

 実のところ、英国のNAFTA加盟は決して非現実的な話ではない。米国テキサス州選出のフィル・グラム上院議員も、それを提案したことがある。間違いなくその案は、英国のみならず、米国とカナダでも少なからぬ支持を得るだろう。

 EUの一員である限り、英国がNAFTAに加盟することはできない。しかしEUから離脱するなら、話は別だ。これは英国にとって好ましいシナリオになる。なぜならNAFTAに加盟すれば、経済に何らの規制を負わされることなく、北米と自由貿易を行えるからだ。しかもEUを含む世界中の国々やブロックを相手に、FTA交渉を行うこともできる。

 もうひとつ、興味をそそる展望がある。英国は、「英連邦」と呼ばれる素晴らしい国家グループの中心にいる。英国民の意識の中ではこのグループの存在感は薄れつつあるが、GDPの総計は相対的に急速な成長を遂げている。

 保守党政権の元閣僚のデビッド・ハウエルも、近著『Old Links New Ties』の中で、英連邦は英国にとって有望だと主張した。彼は次のように力説する。

 英連邦のネットワークは54の独立国(英国王を自国の国王とする16の国々と、38の共和国など)に広がっている。人口は20億人を超えており、全人類のほぼ3分の1を占める。また少なくとも机上の計算では、世界貿易の20%のシェアと、欧州を嫉妬させるほどの成長期待を持つ、経済的巨人である。

 英連邦の成長期待がどれほど魅力的かは、どんなに強調しても足りないだろう。アジアの加盟国に限った話ではない。英連邦には近年力強い成長を見せるアフリカの国々も数多く含まれている。実際、アフリカ経済が20年ほど前の「アジアの虎」たちのように急上昇しようとしていると考える専門家は多い。興味深いのは、意外なことに、英連邦がかつての大英帝国の国々以外にも開かれていることだ。モザンビークとルワンダはすでに加盟した。ほかにも大英帝国に1度も属したことのない国々が、加盟への関心を示している。

 もちろん英連邦に期待しすぎるのは禁物だ。これはEUのような形の経済ブロックではなく、自由貿易圏や関税同盟でさえないのだ。しかし、だから無意味だとも言えない。デビッド・ハウエルも強調するとおり、デジタルでネットワーク化された新世界では、国々のブロックという考え方は次第に時代遅れになりつつある。英連邦が加盟国に提供するのは、貿易を促進する一連のつながりや結びつきだ。その中核には英語という言語と、英国のモデルを基礎とする制度や法の体系が存在する。

 英連邦の投資銀行や英連邦の就労ビザ、英連邦専用の空港の窓口を設けようという提案さえあった。こうしたものが大きく現状を変える原動力になるとも思えないが、英連邦の貿易増がもたらす将来性については軽視しないほうがいい。結局のところ、EUだって欧州石炭鉄鋼共同体から始まったのだ。

 英国がEU離脱後に締結の努力をするべき協定をまとめてみよう。

 ・EUとのFTA
NAFTAへの加盟
・世界のできるだけ多くの国々(中国を含む)とのFTA
・英連邦諸国との連携強化

 このような未来像を考えるとき、英国人の多くは――それに英国以外の人々も――こんなふうに想像する。英国はひどく小さく、取るに足らない国だから、FTA交渉などできないと。それは誤りだ。英国はロシアやブラジルやインドを上回る世界第6位の経済規模を有している。英国は依然として大国なのである。

 その英国が、どうして満足のいく貿易協定を結べないはずがあろうか。米国にはそれができていると私が言えば、「米国は特に大きいからだ」という答えが返ってくるかもしれない。ならばシンガポールはどうかと問えば、「特に小さいからだ」と返されるかもしれない。どうも悲観論者たちの考えでは、国たるものはとても大きいかとても小さいかのどちらかでなければならず、英国は中途半端であるようだ。「小国であるには大きすぎ、大国であるには小さすぎる」としたら、まるで童話「3びきのくま」(主人公の少女が「ちょうどよい温かさのスープ」や「ちょうどよい堅さのベッド」を見つける)の逆バージョンではないか。

 これはナンセンスだ。現実の英国は依然として重要な経済国家であり、他国から見れば大きな輸出市場となっている。英国は(スイスがそうであるように)世界の多くの国々と好ましい貿易関係を結べる地位にある。

 それに多くの人々は、世界的な影響力の低下は避けられないと決めてかかっているが、英国はGDPのランキングを堅持するだろうし、いくつか順位を上げる可能性もある。

 人口学的な要因も大きなインパクトを与えそうだ。大規模な移民によって状況が根本的に変わらない限り、ドイツ、イタリア、スペインの人口は減少していくだろう。フランスの人口は若干増加したあとで安定に向かう。一方、英国の人口は目に見えて増えていくだろう。おそらく2050年以降に、英国の人口がドイツを上回ることになりそうだ。

 かくして英国は、おそらく欧州で最大の経済規模を持つ国となる。GDPではブラジルとインドに抜かれるのは確実だが、フランスとドイツを抜くだろうから、世界ランキングは依然として第6位のままだ(これは市価のGDPを比較したもの。購買力平価では幾分違ったランキングになるだろうが、実質的な論点は揺るがない)

 英国に投資する日本企業には、意を強くしてもらいたい。ここで声を大にして言っておくが、たとえEUから離脱しても、英国はEUとの緊密な貿易関係を維持するだろう。それにEU離脱は、英国にとっての万能薬ではないとはいえ、一連の機会になることは間違いない。

 忘れてならないのは、欧州のほとんどの国々とは違い、英国の人口統計が有望であることだ。先述したように、これから20年もすれば、英国は欧州で最大の経済規模を持つ国になっているだろう。そしてEUにとどまるにせよ離脱するにせよ、英国は間違いなく日本からの投資を歓迎し続けるし、日本の親しい友人・同盟国であり続けるだろう。